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Biotechnology: Cloning

Resources for Grade 10 Socratic Seminar

Why Clone?

     Why Clone?

Our experiences have told us that, with a little work, we humans can clone just about anything we want, from frogs to sheep -- and probably even ourselves.

So we can clone things But why would we want to? Below are some of the ways in which cloning might be useful. 

Genetic Science Learning Center. "Why Clone?." Learn.Genetics. July 10, 2014. learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/cloning/whyclone/. Accessed December 16, 2018.

Cloning

Lots of information, including pros and cons, from the U.S. National Human Genome Research Institute.

Clone Your Dog?

Should you clone your dog?

Klein, Andrew. "Should You Clone Your Dog? Dog owners can now make a genetically identical copy of a beloved pet." Science World/Current Science, 3 Sept. 2018, p. 8+. Student Resources In Context, link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/A551340015/SUIC?u=prin80722&sid=SUIC&xid=7a2f6b4d. Accessed 17 Jan. 2019.

How Cloning Works

"Dolly began as a cell from another sheep that was fused via electricity with a donor egg."

Bonsor, Kevin & Cristen Conger. "How Human Cloning Will Work." HowStuffWorks.com. 2 April 2001. science.howstuffworks.com/life/genetic/human-cloning.htm. Accessed 15 January 2019.

Gene Transfer

Smullen, Bob. IB Biology 3.5 Genetic Modification and Biotechnology. 28 Mar, 2015. www.slideshare.net/smullen57/ib-Biology-35-genetic-modifcation-and-biotechnology. Accessed 24 May 2018.

United Nations International School, Hanoi